In recent weeks America has noticed the importance of healthcare. That is why we need to be vigilant in concerns of how healthcare is accessed. Doctors, nurses, support staff and janitors cooperate to create a public, sterile, professional and helpful facility. Ideally citizens should try to educate themselves before seeking services and the internet is a wonderful clarifier. Intravenous therapy (IVs) is used for multiple reasons consisting of:

  • Rehydration
  • Chemotherapy drugs for patients suffering from cancer
  • Pregnant women delivering an infant
  • Antibiotics for bacterial infections
  • Wellness or chronic hangovers
  • Surgery related to diabetes

IV is the most effective means to deliver substances to a human body on a holistic level because it ensures a safe balance of liquids. Hydration is the most common reason for IVs to be used amongst patients in a health facility. Patients that are sick often lack the ability to drink adequate amounts of fluids and require a more effective method of keeping the body healthy. Instead of the body extracting fluids from the large intestine – an IV cuts out the “middleman” and travels straight to the source. In recent years IVs have become popular with young people who imbibe and wish to recover quickly from a long night out on the town by attending a drip bar session.

Diabetics, athletes and party-goers are some of the people who wonder, “Can I just walk into a clinic and be hooked up to an IV?” This question has grown more in popularity over the years as people are starting to realize the importance of IVs and how effective they are compared to traditional consumptions of vitamins, water, saline fluids, etc. The answer to your question is yes, you can walk into a clinic and ask for an IV. Naturally, a Medicine Doctor (MD), Nurse Practitioner (NP) or Physician’s Assistant (PA) must run through a series of professional formalities before allowing you to lay on the therapeutic bed and receive an IV.

At A Clinic Reception Desk

Before leaving the house, you need to call the health facility you are planning to attend whether it is a large professional hospital, an urgent care facility, or retail health clinic. Calling is a great method to help support staff prepare for your visit. Checking in with the reception desk is like any company. They will put you on a triage list and decide what priority you fall under. Depending on how busy the health facility is, you could wait anywhere from four minutes to four hours. After arriving to a private room, a doctor will come and check your vitals and ask a multitude of cursory questions about your health.

Depending on which professional you see first, the response will differ. MDs are less likely to issue an IV. They are often busier than their coworkers. NPs and PAs are more likely to issue you an IV. Being issued an IV all comes down to the personality and work ethic of the professional who sees you. Those with an empathetic bedside manner are likely to issue an IV even if vitals check out to be normal. Health professionals that require proof need a urine sample from you. Any sample that is darker than yellow is the fastest evidence you qualify for an IV. If your urine is light yellow to clear the chances of receiving an IV are quite low. If you still insist that you would like an IV, health professionals will most likely refuse to draw blood and run lab results because they are costly and time consuming. Simply remember that health facilities operate only for patients that are at-risk and require health-related aid.

Drip bars are becoming more popular over the past five years. They are located mostly in large cities where groups of people can hook up to a sterilized IV for wellness or hydration reasons. Groups visit these institutions to recover from a flu, food poisoning, hangovers or jet lag. These specialized IV locations guarantee you a chance to hook up to an IV but are costly since the service is new and serves a niche clientele. Please stay vigilant during these unsure times and request an IV only if your health is in danger. Any further questions? Call us now at 205-352-9141.

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